Monday, November 05, 2007

Miguel de Unamuno and the Gravitational "Constant"


Miguel de Unamuno and the Gravitational "Constant"

In the last few blogs I posted a few discoveries, like the simple formulas for the Cosmological Constants (permittivity and magnetic susceptibility of vacuum and the Gravitational Constant)...:)

Of course, these are old results already published and contained in the papers at this site.

They are a clear message that the theory presents some easy to test ideas and guidance to help understanding the Cosmos.

Frequently I hear that some explosion happened 10 billion light years and nobody knows why it was sooooooo strong....:)

The non-constantness of the Gravitational Constant is a clear explanation... Anything happening at 10 billion light years would face a value of G equal to our current G multiplied by 13.7/3.7 (considering a 13.7 billion years universe)....:)

If the event happened at 12 billion light years away then G would be equal to our current G multiplied by 13.7/1.7 and so on and so forth...:)

A stronger Gravitation would change the speed of Galaxy seeding, Black Hole formation etc...

Needless to say, astronomic measurements should be insensitive to the absolute value of G. The perceived masses just need to be scaled up for a weaker G.

This is an interesting point and I would love to hear from astronomers what do they think... There is a clear possible disagreement when one consider supernovae... Their explosions are supposed to have constant luninosity across the universe and serve as a candlestick to measure distance...:) How the supernovae creation process be modified by a stronger G at the beginning of times...:)

I suspect the supernovae process would had been accelerated and the underlying sun mass be smaller...the luminosity of their explosion might be the same...:) I suppose someone can model that... or conversely, the original hypothesis needs to be changed to accomodate a variable G.

It is interesting to think that faster supernovae processes means faster heavier isotope creation...

Normally I don't write about Black Holes because I did not propose any model for it yet... There are more important things to clarify before going there...

I suspect I am a teacher at heart....:) As any teacher it is a pleasure to hear questions or even to be challenged by a good student...:)

This is a loose light weight argument (about Supernovae) and can be fodder for discussion...:)

Please make your opinion heard... Only by criticism this theory can evolve.

Cheers,

MP
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